Glimpse of Wearable Art

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Discover the art of Shibori with Kate, owner of Yuiitsu Dye Shop. Yuiitsu is Japanese for “only one”. As she likes to say, all of Kate’s products are one of a kind due to the euphorically natural dying process!

Her unconditional love for what she does is obvious as she opens up about her passion. 

 

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What is Shibori?

Shibori is a Japanese hand dyeing technique that dates back to the 8th century. The process occurs by binding, twisting, folding, stitching, or compressing fabric to create a resist. Fabric portions with the most pressure do not absorb dye while areas of fabric with the least pressure become the most saturated.


How did Shibori become trendy in the United States?

I am not entirely sure how Shibori became popular in the United States. I think there is a consumer movement desiring handcrafted goods and moving away from mass-market products. I also think there is a consumer movement that is looking for products that are unique and completely one of a kind. Shibori goods accomplish both wishes.

How did you learn the practice of Shibori hand dyeing?

I worked for a company after college that specialized in Shibori hand dyeing and was fortunate enough to learn the skill and get to practice it over the last 3 years.

How do you do Shibori?

There are many different types of Shibori. All require applying pressure to the fabric in varied ways. I specialize in Itajime and Arashi Shibori. Arashi requires accordion folded fabric bunched and tied to PVC piping while Itajime requires folding and clamping over blocks of wood. Both practices require fully submerging product in a dye bath.

Itajime Shibori

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Arashi Shibori

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Submerging process

What do you teach on Keenobby?

In my Shibori workshops, I teach how to do Itajime Shibori (traditional shibori) and mineral dyeing (non-traditional shibori). I teach how to prepare the bath, work with the dyes, and rinse out the products effectively. A canvas bag and silk scarf are given to each student in the class. Come join us for a good time!

 


Check Kate’s upcoming workshops on Keenobby: https://www.keenobby.com/activity/shibori-workshop/

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If you are interested in getting more information about Yuiitsu Dye Shop, take a look at her website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/YuiitsuDyeShop?ref=l2-shopheader-name

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